News

This week at Trinity

This Week at Trinity

 

Weekly Announcements

March 26 Full page

 

Holy Week & Easter Schedule

Holy Week & Easter Schedule

Palm Sunday April 9

  •  8:00 a.m.         Rite I Holy Eucharist
  • 10:30 a.m.        Rite II Choral Eucharist
  • 12:30 p.m.       La Santa Eucaristia, Rito II
  • (Distribution of Palms at all services)

Maundy Thursday April 13

  • 6:15 p.m.          “Supper” at  Great Hall, directly behind the Church
  • 7:00 p.m.         Joint Service with Our Lady of Guadalupe

Good Friday April 14

  • 12:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m.    The seven last words of Jesus: Readings, meditations and music.
    • 7:00 pm    Estaciones de la Cruz/Stations of the Cross (Espanol)

The Great Vigil of Easter April 15

  •  7:30 p.m.          Rite II Holy Eucharist – the first Eucharist of Easter;

Easter Day April 16

  • 8:00 a.m.          Rite I Holy Eucharist
  • 10:30 a.m.        Rite II Festival Eucharist
  • 12:30 p.m.      La Santa Eucaristia, Rito II

There will be an Easter Egg hunt after the 10:30 a.m. Service

The Carillon Newsletter – March

The Carillon Newsletter – March

03 2017 Carillon for the web

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

 

2017 Pledge Drive

2017 Pledge Drive

Local Saints Included in Episcopal Liturgial Calendar

General Convention accepted resolutions from six dioceses to include El Camino Real’s saints in the Episcopal liturgical calendar. The memory of the Rev. Peter Williams Cassey, his wife Annie Besant Cassey and her mother, Henrietta Lockwood were adopted into the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church last Friday in Salt Lake City. Peter was the first person of color ordained West of the Mississippi River at Trinity Church, San Jose in 1866. He and his wife, Annie and her mother, Henrietta Lockwood founded St.Philip’s School for Colored Children in 1862 and Phoenixonian Hall, the first secondary school for black students in California in 1866. Henrietta, a nurse, was the first black medical professional in Santa Clara County. She and Annie are buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, San Jose and a new headstone is being prepared for their graves. The resolution which was passed included over 30 names, many of them women to bring gender parity to our calendar of saints. This set in motion a process to prepare and publish an expanded set of feast days with collects, readings and biographies of these heroes of faith. “A Great Cloud of Witnesses” will be published for the next General Convention in three years. However, the collect and readings for Peter, Annie and Henrietta annually are distributed from Trinity Cathedral prior to their feast days.

Read More about The Cassey Family.

The Carillon Newsletter – May

The Carillon Newsletter – May

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - May

Impact of Our Local Saints on San Jose

Standing Witness – Peter & Anna Cassey, Henrietta Lockwood
SJSU 4-18-15 talk given by Rev. Jerry Drino

Against the Odds

April 18, 1865.  The Civil War is over.  Shock is gripping the country as news spreads that President Abraham Lincoln died three days ago.  San Jose is in mourning, but there is an edge of fear in the homes and schools, the businesses and churches:  What will happen next?

This frontier city, with muddy streets is still gripped by deep divisions that plagued the community since it began to grow after statehood in 1850.  When news reached this pueblo that the Civil War had broken out on April 12, 1861, the populous was divided between Northern and Southern sympathizers.  Over the next four years rebels tried, but failed to seize the town, rob the banks and go from door to door taking what valuables could be found and send the loot off to the Confederacy.  The Methodist church in Berryessa was burned to the ground by rebels who found safe haven in several ranchos on the Eastside.

During the 1850’s San Jose came to be known as the murder capitol of California.  As this wild west city grew, the small black community, which numbered 43 in 1852, including 11 slaves, struggled for a foothold.  Slaves in San Jose where not limited to Negroes.   Malyasians and Kanakas (or Hawaiians) were brought from Hawaii starting with the Gold Rush.

The Federal Fugitive Slave act of 1850 was supported by the state’s first governor, Peter Burnett, who lived just six blocks away from here, on 5th Street.  He had declared genocide against all the indigenous tribes of California early in his term of office.

Something quite amazing was happening in the black community, which Dr. Ruffin will give a broader picture of in a moment.   A growing black middle class was developing in spite of threats of being wrongly abducted.  There was sufficient advocacy and support of blacks in the community so that the first two black institutions could be established under the leadership of one man:  Peter Williams Cassey with the support of his wife, Anna Besant Cassey, his mother-in-law, Henrietta Lockwood and other key leaders of the black community, such as Jacob Overton.  One of these institutions was a church and one was a school – they were inter-related and carried the same name:  St. Philip’s Academy and Mission for Colored Children.

The irony of geography is that St. Philip’s came to be located 7 blocks west of Governor Burnett’s home on 5th Street – a tension that would have been obvious 150 years ago.

Peter Williams Cassey:

Where did he come from? Here’s a brief introduction:  His life represents both a personal continuum of the Williams-Cassey family as well as the broader convergence of social movements that begin with the first protests against slavery when that horific institution was brought to these shores in the 1600’s.

The arc of Peter’s heritage is impressive.  He was a forth generation free African American.  His parents were prominent Philadelphia abolitionist, community leaders and among the educated and wealthy black elite.  Growing up Peter was shaped by the frequent visits to his home by such notables as Sarah Mapps Douglass, Margaretta Forten, Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, and Wendell Phillips.  His maternal great grand father, the Rev. Peter Williams, Sr. bought his and his family’s freedom from the Methodist Church in Manhattan to which they were bound in 1773.  He was a Revolutionary War veteran, and founded the second African Methodist Episcopal Church in the US.  His son, Peter Williams, Jr. was at the head of the abolitionist movement in New York.  In 1808, at the age of 28 he was chosen to give a speech on the first anniversary of the United States’ abolition of the international slave trade.  This speech was published as a pamphlet; it was one of the earliest publications by a black about abolition.  He was the first ordained black Episcopal priest in New York, the second in the U.S.

Anna, his wife, would receive a sound education.  This would serve her well as one of the primary teachers of St. Philip’s Academy and, later, the Phoenixonian Institute.

The theologian Howard Thurman, a San Franciscan, wrote: Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive, and go and do that, because what the world needs is people who have come alive.(footnote)

Peter, Anna and Henrietta knew what made them fully alive and for the time that they were in San Jose and California, they made significant difference.  Peter arrives in 1853, looking for his fortune like the tens of thousands of others that sailed through the Golden Gate in search of gold.  A trained barber, he established a shop in the basement of the Union Hotel in the frontier town of San Francisco.  Even though California was a free state there were thousands of slaves, bound by southern families who had immigrated here.  Having a significant inheritance from his father, he joined others in buying slaves and giving them their freedom.  They were founders of the Underground Railroad.  He was instrumental in forming the first Congress of Colored Citizens of California in 1855.

Notice the audacious claim the he and other African Americans were asserting six years before the Civil War and ten years before the abolishment of slavery in the U.S:

The Congress of Colored Citizens of California.

He and Anna married and moved to San Jose 1860, where there was more ethnic tolerance.  However, slaves were still being sold in San Jose and, Peter along with a Mrs. Harriet Davis began buying bonded persons and setting them free.  When Trinity Episcopal Church was formed in 1861, Peter was listed on the roles, the only white Protestant church to have blacks as founding members. Their daughter, Amy, was among the first children baptized there.  In 1863, he led in the organizing of the third Congress of Colored Citizens of California that was held in San Jose, which made education and suffrage critical topics for convention delegates, according to Dr. Ruffin.   In his book, “Uninvited Neighbors” he goes on to say that the Phoenixonia Institute regularly brought national attention to the blacks in Santa Clara County…recruiting students through its fabulous reputation, black networks and African American newspapers.” (p. 39)

Public schools in the city at that time were limited to white students. So Peter and Anna, along with Henrietta gathered the black community to found both a school and a worshipping community called St. Philip’s Academy and Mission.  They eventually rented the former Bascom School for Girls at the edge of town at San Salvador between  3rd and 4th Streets only  a few blocks for here. Students were not only from the black community, but Chinese, Mexican and Muwekma communities, as well. Being a boarding school it drew students from throughout California and as far away as Portland, Oregon and Nicaragua.

There are two articles from the San Jose Mercury of 1863 that frame the significance of this man, the black community and the school and church;

The headline of the January 16-22, 1863 edition read:

“Negroes Establish School of the Own” – and went on to say,

“A sufficient sum has been subscribed by the colored people of this city for the support of a free school for themselves which commence on Monday at the old hospital building on San Carlos Street.  Peter W. Casey (sic) is the teacher.” (“When San Jose Was Young, Nov 20, 1933 SJMerc p 43)

Then in the November 13-19,, 1863 issue the headline read

“Editor Protests Negro Segregation”   with a subscript:

Excluded from the public schools, Negro children of San Jose attend a school of their own conducted by Peter W. Cassey and maintained from public funds. 

A clear shift had occurred from January to November of that year.  Thanks to people like J.J. Cliff, editor of the Mercury News, and other prominent white citizens, the San Jose School Board had contracted with Cassey to provide a free primary education for black students at public expense.  Upon visiting this institution, the article by Owen went on to say

There were 28 scholars in attendance, and a brighter, more intelligent, or more advanced set of scholars of their ages, taken as a whole, cannot be found in this city.  Many of the children are almost white, with fine intellectual heads, well dressed and tidy, in personal appearance cleanly and well behaved…” (WSJWY Nov 13-19, p 86)

We might call St. Philip’s Academy the first charter school in San Jose.   licensed and financially supports St. Philip’s as a school for colored students starting in 1863.  In that year Peter and the black community established the first secondary school for blacks in California: the Phoenixonian Institute or Hall, named after similarly named institutions that had been organized his grand parents and parents.

Peter was trained under the Rev. Dinsmore Chapin and ordained a deacon at Trinity Church in 1866 by the Rt Rev. William Ingrham Kip, first Episcopal Bishop of California.  Peter was the first person of color ordained in the Episcopal Church west of the Mississippi.  1871, at the direction of Bishop Kip he was to found Christ Church in San Francisco, now St. Cyprians.  He divided his time between the two cities, with Anna, Henrietta and black leaders like Jacob Overton keeping St. Philip’s and the Phoenixonia Hall going until 1875 when the State Supreme Court mandated all public schools integrated.

Anna died that year on September 3 and was buried at Oak Hill Cemetery.  Three years later Henrietta died and was buried next to her.  Her death certificate lists her as a nurse, undoubtedly the first black medical professional in San Jose.   Peter eventually shifted his efforts to San Francisco and Oakland where he would gather a small Episcopal community that would eventually form St. Augustine’s parish.  In 1883 he was called to found the first black Episcopal parish in North Carolina, St. Cyprians.  It was there that he helped found another school for black children.  He married Ella ____ in 1885.  In 1893 he was called by the Bishop of Florida to found not one, but three black parishes in succession, serving there until April 16, 1917 when he died at the age of 84 at St. Augustine serving as the vicar of his third St. Cyprian’s Church.

This coming July the national Episcopal Church will meet in their General Convention in Salt Lake City.  Among the considerations on the agenda will be the inclusion of memory of Peter, Anna and Henrietta in the calendar of saints, with prayers offered on their death days, their birthdays into eternal life.  Tomorrow you are welcomed to join us at Trinity Cathedral, 2nd and St. John’s for the 10:30 service honoring them where Canon Jamesetta Hammons from Los Angeles will preach.  At 2:00 pm we will gather at Oak Hill Cemetery at the graves of Anna and Henrietta for prayers and then again at 4:30 at the Cathedral for Evensong in their honor led by Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves with Fr. Ronald Culmer preach concluded by a Gospel music program.

It is my deep honor to recognize among us Dianna Cassey, great grand daughter of Peter and Ella Cassey, ________________ direct descendent of John Brown or Harper’s Ferry, Phil Hanasaki whose family were leaders at Christ Church, San Francisco when it became a Japanese parish and St. Cyprian’s was formed as the black parish in the City; and Canon Jamessetta Hammons, Treasurer of the Belfield Hannibal Chapter of the Union of Black Episcopalians in the Diocese of Los Angeles who will preach tomorrow morning at Trinity Cathedral.

Jerry Drino
Priest-Historian
Cassey Memorial Project
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral

 

The Carillon Newsletter – April

The Carillon Newsletter – April

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - April

 

The Carillon Newsletter – March

The Carillon Newsletter – March

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - March

The Carillon Newsletter – February

The Carillon Newsletter – February

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - February“]

The Carillon Newsletter – January

The Carillon Newsletter – January

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - January“]

Carillon Project 2014

bell image2A Brief History

Trinity’s historic bells have been witness to major events in downtown San Jose since the first five bells were given by the children of  Trinity’s Sunday School in 1880. Since then the bells have rung out to the Glory of God and in celebration of local and national events. They even survived and rang on their own in the earthquakes of 1906 and 1989!

The bell chime has been expanded three times, the last being in the Bicentennial Year 1976, to a mini -carillon of 18 bells played from a console chamber located in the tower below the bells themselves. A dedicated team of bell ringers regularly play the bells before Sunday morning worship services, at weddings, funerals and for public concerts in St. James Park on major holidays. In June 2008, the Trinity Bells were the center piece of sound sculpture, “Sonic Cascades”, created by internationally renowned artist, Bill Fontana, as part of the City of San Jose’s Who’s on First, What’s on Second public art project. Fontana captured the sounds of the bell, digitally mixed them and broadcasted them up and down 2nd Street. The result was an enveloping sound blanket invoking wedding bells, clock towers and centuries old European towns all rolled into one!

– Paul Archambeault, Project Chairman

Listeners and ringers alike enjoy Public Concerts

Listeners and ringers alike enjoy Public Concerts

 

Bells make a statement that the church is alive and well in the local community

 

Become a Part of Trinity

As a part of  Trinity Cathedral’s 150th Anniversary celebration Trinity has embarked on a long held dream of renovating and expanding the 18 bell chime to a 24 bell carillon with the ability to add additional bells in the future to create a 43 bell carillon. The expanded carillon will be one of only three traditional, manually operated caril- lons in the Bay Area, the other two being the Campanile at UC Berkeley and the carillon in Hoover Tower on the Stanford University cam- pus. The new carillon will be a concert quality musical instrument that will enhance worship and celebration at Trinity as well as be a major asset for the arts and culture in downtown San Jose.

Meeks, Watson and Company, Georgetown, Ohio, is casting the six new bells and is also building the new bell frame, cabling and console capable of allowing us to add bells easily in the future to build the carillon to the ultimate 43 bells.

bells image3To accommodate the weight of the additional bells and ensure the ability of the historic tower to safely withstand future wind and earthquake activity, Trinity has engaged Biggs, Cardosa Engineering and Blach Construction to de- sign and complete the necessary work to strengthen the tower.
Growing our chime to 24 bells will make Trinity’s carillon one of only six manual carillons in California and the only one in the Bay Area located in a house of worship.

 

bells image4
“Church bells celebrate life and liberty, call parishioners to prayer, chime in celebration, toll in reverence, and ring in remembrance.  They call us to honor our past and set the tone for our future. Bringing order and inspiration to life, church bells have always been, and will continue to be a cherished part of community life.”

 

How You Can Participate in this Project

Dedicate a bell in honor or memory of someone important in your life.

Make a general donation to the project.

For more information, please contact Trinity’s office at 408 293-7953 or [email protected]

 

 

Celtic Christmas Concert – Fri. Dec. 19

woPoster1214

printable flyer – CLICK HERE    

The Carillon Newsletter – December

The Carillon Newsletter – December

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - December“]

Holiday Services & Event Schedule 2014

Holiday Service Schedule 2014c

Hope With South Sudan Urges Movie Goers This Sunday – Nov. 16

goog lieThis Sunday, November 16 members of the diocese have a wonderful opportunity to be drawn into the lives of the Lost Boys/Girls of South Sudan. “The Good Lie” is a compelling film and a fairly accurate portrayal of our own South Sudan
ese struggle to survive fleeing their home villages, the ordeals of living in a refugee camp for ten years and then the challenges of new struggles in America. It is a triumph of the spirit. After the 2:20 showing members of our South Sudanese community will be available to answer questions about their own journeys. This is a shared witness to the triumph of the spirit. To quote from the film, “We are the strongest when we believe in ourselves. There will be opportunity to hear more about the work of Hope With South Sudan www.hopewithsouthsudan.org, which began 12 years ago shortly after the resettlement of the Lost Boys in San Jose.

Time: 2:20 at Nichelodean, 210 Lincoln St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060. (831) 426-7500

http://www.fandango.com/thegoodlie_164751/movieoverview

The Carillon Newsletter – November

The Carillon Newsletter – November

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - November“]

Celebrate the Season Concert – Sat. Dec. 13

woPoster1214-3

printable flyer – CLICK HERE 

Trinity Cathedral Concert – Sun. Nov. 16

Organ concert on Nov. 16, 2014

Trinity Cathedral Concert – Fri. Nov. 14

Stanislav Yovanovitch concert on Nov. 14, 2014

South Sudanese Sports for Peace Has UN Endorsement

South Sudanese Sports for Peace and Reconciliation members pose on August 15, 2014, at the conclusion of a week-long training.

Sports for Peace Initiative in Kakuma Refugee Camp

South Sudanese Sports for Peace and Reconciliation members pose on August 15, 2014, at the conclusion of a week-long training.
Hope With South Sudan has become a key partner in an effort to establish a peace center in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya where nearly 130,000 South Sudanese have fled the conflict in their country.  In  March we invited Bishop Mary of our Diocese along with the Bishop of the Diocese of Olympia (Washington), Trinity Church, Seattle and the American Friends of the Episcopal Church in Sudan/South Sudan to support the efforts of Bishop Abraham Yel Nhial of Aweil Diocese. 

Read more South Sudanese Sports for Peace and Reconciliation Now Has UN Endorsement | Hope With South Sudan.

Trinity Cathedral Concerts – Sat. Oct. 18

oct17concert

Our Sudanese Friend – Gabriel Makuei Tor

gabriel tor

Visit Gabriel’s Travel Journal 2014. View pictures from his recent visit to Kenya and South Sudan, where he visited his orphan-nieces and nephews at Kakuma Refugee camp, and students in the Hope with South Sudan scholarship program.

Visit the Gabriel’s site Gabriel Makuei Tor.

The Carillon Newsletter – October

The Carillon Newsletter – October

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - October

 

Girl Talk – Teen Monologue Series – Sept. 28

DATE: Sunday- Sept 28
TIME: 2:00 – 4:00 pm
The Roxie Theatre
3117 16th Street
San Francisco CA 94103

A collection of true stories about real teens struggling with tough issues surrounding self-esteem.

Come hear powerful teen stories about real-life struggles with friends, peer pressure, anxiety and how they survived.

Presented by:

Dr. Carol, Teen Advocate:

Youth, Culture and Self-esteem Expert
Author of: Girl Talk: Boys, Bullies and Body Image.
A book about teens, written specifically for a teen audience.

FOR MORE DETAILS GO TO

DR-CAROL.COM

Click here for the flyer.

The Carillon Newsletter – September

The Carillon Newsletter – September

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - August

 

Road Closures: Fri. Oct. 3 – Sun. Oct. 5 – Rock ‘n’ Roll San Jose 1/2 Marathon

SJ Road Closure Grid

Road Closures Community Notes

Lunch for People Who are Homeless – Sept.

CLICK HERE to read our September update in pdf format.

Good Will, Good Work Exhibition (thru Aug. 31)

Good Will, Good Works—Trinity Cathedral in San Jose 1861-2014
Culture Heritage Center of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Library
150 E. San Fernando Street from June 24 to August 31.

The exhibition at the Culture Heritage Center of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Library links the past with the present missions and ministries of Trinity Cathedral, the oldest active church building in San Jose at 81 N. Second Street.

Inclusion and nurturing of California’s diverse population through establishment of new congregations, called missions—which still flourish—are celebrated. Historic and contemporary photographs and documents chronicle pioneer African Americans in the congregation and clergy in Santa Clara County history. Trinity’s music ministry of concerts, liturgical choir, and historic carillon now in restoration resounds to the future. The worshipping community of La Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe and Hope with South Sudan, initiated by South Sudanese Episcopalians in the parish are highlighted. Members’ volunteer outreach delivers food to shelters in San Jose. Many community service and recovery programs find a home at Trinity Cathedral.

“We have striven to make our mission be a blessing!” words of Peter William Cassey, ordained into the Episcopal clergy at Trinity in 1866. The mission was quality education for people of color; Cassey established the St. Phillip’s Academy on S. 4th Street in San Jose, affiliated with Trinity Cathedral. The school expanded to add the Pheonixonian Institute, the first secondary school for African American students in California. Latino and Chinese students as well were accepted in the Cassey’s school.

Today’s ministries and missions of Trinity Cathedral in San Jose are focused in the exhibition, curated by Jean Libby, a retired community college history instructor with a not-for-profit small publishing group Allies for Freedom—Multicultural Perspectives.

The exhibition opens June 24, 2014 at the Culture Heritage Center. An opening reception will be held on July 2nd from 1 to 3 p.m. The Very Rev. David Bird, Dean and Rector of the Cathedral, will informally discuss the past and present links with San Jose at the event. “Good Will, Good Works—Trinity Cathedral in San Jose 1861-2014” will be on display until August 31.

[email protected] Mobile 415-505-5131

Lunch for People Who are Homeless

For the first of two meals in June, 12 volunteers gathered on Saturday morning to make and serve a lunch to residents of both the Cecil White Center and the nearby Julian St. Inn. We served a resident favorite; pasta with meat sauce, garlic bread, and green salad, along with milk and juice, ice cream sundaes, and an assortment of pies and fruit.

A special thank you goes to friend of the parish, Ben White, who acted as lunch coordinator. As all good leaders do, he jumped in and went right to work; first on the meat for the sauce, slicing open the packages and breaking up the very cold meat and later, washing and slicing stalks of celery for the meat sauce.

Many thanks go to Leslie Barr for her menu idea and to Erin McCauley, who shopped for all the groceries early in the week and loaded them into the refrigerator for us to use on Saturday. (Thanks in advance to Lindy Hayes who will do the shopping for next Saturday’s lunch at the San Jose Family Shelter.) Thank you to Darryl Parker who was our chef this morning. He slaved over the hot stove, creating the delicious meat sauce as well as the special garlic butter topping for the garlic bread.

Thanks to parishioner Roger Lobbes who got an early start and brought to boil the big pot of water for the pasta. A big thank you goes to today’s new volunteer; Rebecca Singh, who has been attending the Brent Walters seminars at Trinity, saw a notice for the lunch, and decided to help. She first worked with returning friend of parish, Steven Shortt, parishioner, Kimberly Fong (who was one of three youngsters helping today), and Roger to produce a half dozen steamy and garlicky loaves of garlic bread. Later, Rebecca helped with prepping the veggies for the salad.

Thank you, once again, to Rick Hawes, for donating the veggies for the salad, several jugs of juice, a big bag of oranges, apples, and bananas, and several fruit pies. He also organized the salad-making activities, with parishioner Michelle Fong washing all the veggies, and friends of the parish Susan Parks, and Vivian and Philip Chu (the other two youngsters) and their dad, Harrison, doing the slicing, dicing, and grating

Thanks again to Lucky supermarket, at the corner of Saratoga and Pruneridge Avenues in Santa Clara, and especially managers, Andrew and Reuben, and bakers, Ernie, Amina, and Sandy for their continuing support. They donated a dozen loaves of hot and fresh French bread for our garlic bread and many mouth-watering cakes and pastries. Another big thank you goes to Ben for arranging, picking up, and delivering the baked goods.

The next lunch will be held on Saturday, July 10, 2014. About 10 volunteers are needed for this local mission activity so if your schedule allows please consider coming and helping. We meet to prepare lunch at 10:15 am in the kitchen of the Parish Hall. No experience is required, just a desire to help those less fortunate than ourselves. There is a sign-up sheet on the bulletin board in the Parish Hall. If you have any questions, please ask any of the volunteers or Fr. Bird.

National Night Out – St. James Park – Aug. 5th

CLICK HERE to view flyer.

Lunch for People Who are Homeless – July

CLICK HERE to read our July update in pdf format.

Upcoming Concerts – Sunday Aug. 3

Upcoming Concerts – Sunday Aug. 3

SUNDAY, August 3rd at 4:00 P.M. Trinity Episcopal Cathedral

CLICK HERE to view the flyer

More details are posted in our PDF version of the WEEKLY ANNOUNCEMENTS – CLICK HERE.

The Carillon Newsletter – July

The Carillon Newsletter – July

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - July

 

Sat. June 14 – Diocese of El Camino Real Gathering of Healing Ministers

Sat. June 14 –  Diocese of	 El Camino Real Gathering of Healing	Ministers
  • Saturday, June 14th — from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church
  • 13601 Saratoga Avenue, Saratoga
  • Location: in the Center

Click here for the informational flyer.

The Carillon Newsletter – June

The Carillon Newsletter – June

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE for The Carillon Newsletter - June

 

The Carillon Newsletter – May

The Carillon Newsletter – May

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE

 

The Carillon Newsletter – April

The Carillon Newsletter – April

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE

 

The Episcopal Church Women’s Day

Saturday April 5 – click HERE for details.

Crisis in South Sudan – Appeal to the President and Congress

Crisis in South Sudan – Appeal to the President and Congress
  • sudan flag 210,000+ dead and 200,000+ displaced in the past 4 weeks
  • 84,000 displaced people taking shelter with the Episcopal Church of South Sudan
  • You can help!

Excerpt from MEMO: January 10, 2014

TO: Members of the Administration, Members of Congress

FROM:The Episcopal Church, Office of Government Relations

In recent weeks, Episcopalians, along with countless other Americans and people around the world, have watched with broken hearts as violence has ravaged South Sudan, the world’s newest state, and visited additional suffering upon peoples who have endured as much or more violence and upheaval as any in the world over the past five decades.   Through partnership with our brothers and sisters in the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan, Episcopalians and other Anglicans around the world have heard firsthand the stories of how the senseless violence has rent apart communities and placed the very long-term future of peace itself at risk.   Our most-current reports indicate that violence is still spreading and that the urgent needs for food, medicine, and shelter could continue for months to come.

The Episcopal Church, along with Episcopal and Anglican partners around the world, has mounted its own response of financial support, material accompaniment, and prayer for the people of South Sudan.   We believe strongly that the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan and other faith groups there are among the most fruitful potential actors in leading and facilitating peace, humanitarian assistance, and healing. Urgent and intensified leadership from the United States government and the international community – including specific partnerships with the faith community – is essential in stemming the tide of the present violence and building instead a future of peace.

Read the full text of the Appeal go to Hope With South Sudan www.hopewithsouthsudan.org  and click News.

Also go to the Episcopal News Service http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/ens/tag/southsudancrisis/

Donations can be made directly online to:

Episcopal Relief and Development www.episcopalrelief.org or Hope With South Sudan.

O Almighty God, 

the Father of all humanity, we offer up the crisis in South Sudan; turn, we pray, the hearts of the people and their leaders, that by the power of your Holy Spirit peace may be established in the nation on the foundation of justice, righteousness and truth; relieve the starving and sick, rescue those in dire need, comfort all the people caught in this terrible conflict, through him who was lifted up on the cross to draw all people to himself, your Son Jesus 

The Carillon Newsletter – March

The Carillon Newsletter – March

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE

 

Trinity Cathedral Concerts – Sat. March 15

Trinity Cathedral Concerts – Sat. March 15

SATURDAY, MARCH 15TH 7:30 P.M. Trinity Episcopal Cathedral

AN EVENING OF MUSIC INSPIRED BY THE SOUNDS OF AMERICA AND SPAIN, FEATURING DVORAK’S 9TH SYMPHONY (FROM THE NEW WORLD) AND LALO’S SYMPHONY

ESPAGNOLE WITH STEPHEN WAARTS, VIOLINIST

PLUS THE WORLD PREMIERE OF IN PARADISO BY HENRY MOLLICONE STEPHEN WAARTS, SOLO VIOLIN TONY CLEMENTS, GUEST CONDUCTOR HENRY MOLLICONE, MUSIC DIRECTOR

Click here to view the the FLYER.

The Carillon Newsletter – February

The Carillon Newsletter – February

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE

 

Partners in Education with Hope With South Sudan

Partners in Education with Hope With South Sudan

Dear Partners in Education with Hope With South Sudan

I greet you in the New Year with both hope and deep concern. The hope resides in our 53 students who began a new term in their schools in Kenya and Uganda. We rejoice that they are able to continue their education and are thankful to all of you for making this possible.

At the same time we and the Sudanese community carry a deep concern over the crisis that erupted in South Sudan on December 15. Initially, the conflict broke out in the army between those who were supportive of the President, Salva Kiir and those loyal to the former Vice President, Riek Machar. However, it has now spread into five of the ten states of South Sudan with Jonglei suffering perhaps the greatest devastation. This is the state from which our students families come and from which most of the Sudanese here in San Jose fled in 1987. In three weeks over 230,000 people were displaced from their villages and over 2000 killed.

The State Capitol of Bor Town has been burned to the ground. A reported 83,000 people have fled to the bush along the Nile in hopes of crossing to a safer location. However, the figure for all locations maybe closer to a quarter million. Many of those fleeing must hide in waist-high water of the marshes. Members of our students’ extended families are caught in this situation. Several thousand have been killed including family members of our students and local Sudanese, untold numbers wounded. Cholera is spreading rapidly along with starvation.

Daily phone calls to East African and a stream of emails from those on the ground are keeping our office informed. I and Robin Denney of our diocese of El Camino Real have been in on weekly international conference calls through the offices of the Archbishop of Sudan, Archbishop of Canterbury, the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, the American Friends of the Episcopal Church in Sudan, and those connected with State Department, the Foreign Office (UK) and the UN to share intelligence from the ground as it is gathered and to have updates on diplomatic and humanitarian efforts as they unfold.

On January 9 the Foreign Relations Committee of Congress met with Secretary of State Kerry to assess the situation and further the US response. They acknowledged the role of the Church in Sudan as being crucial to accessing populations that are isolated from aid coming through NGOs.
The Episcopal Office of Government relations sent a letter to the White House and Members of Congress today, appealing for action in the international peace and reconciliation efforts and outlining the strategic resource of the Church in South Sudan as an effective institution of community response. Go to http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/ens/2014/01/06/anglican-communion-responds-to-south for more information The UN, State Department and Red Cross announced that over $110 million in humanitarian aid was been sent to South Sudan. Below is a statement released this morning from the State Department.

Direct support can be made by going to the web site of Episcopal Relief and Development http://www.episcopalrelief.org/ or to Hope With South Sudan www.hopewithsouthsudan.org to give directly to aid relief for refugees caught in this disaster. At this point the strongest institution functioning in South Sudan is not the Government, but the Church. A colleague in the capitol of Juba working for the Sudan Council of Churches said “all the churches are acting as one Church which has in place networks for relief that the Government does not have.”

On every phone call the Sudanese ask that we pray for them. Please do and watch for more information as to how you can help.

Thank you for being in partnership with the Sudanese and with Hope With South Sudan

Jerry Drino
Founder, Co-Chair
Democracy, Human Rights, Refugees: U.S. Calls for Immediate Mediated Political Talks in South Sudan
12/24/2013
You are subscribed to Democracy, Human Rights, & Refugees for U.S. Department of State. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.
Democracy, Human Rights, Refugees: U.S. Calls for Immediate Mediated Political Talks in South Sudan
12/24/2013 02:40 PM EST

U.S. Calls for Immediate Mediated Political Talks in South Sudan

Press Statement
Jen Psaki
Department Spokesperson
Washington, DC
December 24, 2013

________________________________________
Over the past twenty four hours, U.S. officials including Secretary Kerry have made calls to leaders throughout Africa and the world seeking a solution to the crisis in South Sudan. This morning, Secretary Kerry urged both South Sudanese President Salva Kiir and former Vice President Riek Machar to accept a cessation of hostilities and begin mediated political talks. U.S. Special Envoy Donald Booth is in Juba today to attempt to secure final commitment from both President Kiir and Former Vice President Machar to begin talks, and is working with leaders from the Inter-Governmental Authority for Government (IGAD) nations to arrange for the negotiations to begin in the coming days.
The United States urges all parties in the crisis in South Sudan to implement an immediate cessation of hostilities. This will offer critical humanitarian access to populations in dire need and open a space for a mediated political dialogue between the opposing sides.
The ability of the parties to implement the ceasefire will send a strong signal to the citizens of South Sudan and the world that as leaders they have the courage to accept compromise and work for the best interests of all of the people of this young nation. We hope and pray today that the leaders of South Sudan will acknowledge the international community’s commitment and understand that those who seek to take or hold power by violence or division along ethnic lines will not have our support and may be in violation of international law. Violence today will not pave the way for a more stable or prosperous tomorrow.
PRN: 2013/1621

The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Trinity Cathedral Concerts – Sat. Feb. 1

Musica Viva Trio performs Debussy and Saint Saens

This performance is made possible in part by the Harold R. Hayes Fund.

Click here to view the the FLYER.

Harp and Organ Concert – Sun. Jan. 26

Pedals, Pipes and Strings

A program of organ and harp duets.

This performance is made possible in part by the Harold R. Hayes Fund.

Click here to view the the FLYER.

The Carillon Newsletter – January

The Carillon Newsletter – January

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE

 

A Concert to Benefit Those in Poverty – Jan. 12

A Concert to Benefit Those in Poverty – Jan. 12

TRINITY CATHEDRAL and the STONE CHURCH CHOIR OF WILLOW GLEN, Nancy Wait-Kromm, director, will present a benefit concert of choral music for those living in poverty. Proceeds will be divided between DOWNTOWN STREETS TEAM, the social ministry at TRINITY CATHEDRAL, and possibly one other charity that works with the poor. The program of choral music will include composer Henry Mollicone’s BEATITUDE MASS (“Mass for the homeless”) for choir and instrumental ensemble, which has raised well over $140,000 through various performances in several U.S. cities.

  • Date: Sunday, January 12
  • Time: 7pm Place: Trinity Cathedral, 81 North 2nd Street, San Jose 95113
  • Suggested donation: $20
  • Reservations: Leave message for “Henry” at (408) 315-4354
  • Tickets also available at the door.

This performance is made possible in part by the Harold R. Hayes Fund.

Click here to view the the FLYER.

2014 Pledge Drive

2014 Pledge Drive

Holiday Service & Events Schedule 2013

Holiday Service & Events Schedule 2013

Holiday Service & Event Schedule 2013 – CLICK HERE

The Carillon Newsletter – December

The Carillon Newsletter – December

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE

 

Serving Lunch to the Homeless

Serving Lunch to the Homeless

On Saturday, Nov. 9, Trinity members met in the Great Hall to prepare lunch for the homeless. After preparing it, they walked over to the Cecil B. White Center, located behind the Sharks arena, and served it to the homeless.

Click  HERE to view more photos.

 

Trinity Cathedral Upgrades Its Bells

Trinity Cathedral Upgrades Its Bells

San Jose Mercury News – 11/06/2013

Trinity Cathedral in downtown San Jose does not have the tallest bell tower in the Bay Area. It does not have the most bells. It feels more like a historic church than an elaborate cathedral, a wood-paneled refuge rather than a monument.

The Episcopal church on St. James Park is nevertheless about to enter elite company in the bell-ringing world. A year from now, it will have 24 bells, joining the Campanile at UC Berkeley and Hoover Tower at Stanford as the Bay Area’s only official carillons.

Read the full article here:  http://www.mercurynews.com/scott-herhold/ci_24467743/trinity-cathedral-san-jose-upgrades-its-bells

The Carillon Newsletter- November

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE

 

South Sudan Fundraiser Dinner Wed. Nov. 6

INVITE YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY TO DINE WITH US ON Wednedsay Nov. 6.
*Prior to ordering, please present this flyer to your server. 

20% of all qualified guest receipts are donated to Hope With South Sudan’s scholarship fund.
PASTA POMODORO | SAN JOSE
1205 The Alameda | San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 292-9929
www.pastapomodoro.com
Wednesday, November 6th
All Day
Dine In & To-Go

HOPE WITH SOUTH SUDAN FUNDRAISING FLYER – Pasta Pomodora –  Nov. 6 – Please print this flyer & bring and present when you order.

 

The Very Best of CHOPIN – Sat. Nov. 30

Trinity Cathedral presents The Very Best of CHOPIN

Stanislav Yovanovitch, piano

Saturday, November 30, 7:30pm

“Performances very different from anything and everything I’ve heard before. They make me think of a forgotten time….They are incandescent, titanic, lyrical and always committed, original, thought provoking and fascinating….. There is an important artistic message in play”……. New York music critic Radu Lelitui of Fanfare magazine.
———-
Program:
Nocturne Opus 9 No 1
Nocturne Opus 15 No 2
Nocturne Opus 27 No 1
Nocturne Opus 27 No 2
Nocturne Opus 72 No 1
Ballade No 1
Intermission
Mazurka Op 33 in B Minor
Nocturne Opus 48 No 1
Nocturne Opus Postumous No 20
Poloanaise No 1
Polonaise No 4
Polonaise No 5 “Heroic”

———-
Trinity Cathedral
81 N. 2nd Street
San Jose, CA 95113

Tickets: Suggested donation $10.00; Family of four or more $25
For more information on the musician visit www.voyagerlegends.com
This performance is made possible in part by the Harold R. Hayes Fund

Stanislav Yovanovitch concert November 30, 2013 Flyer

Winterdance Celtic Christmas Show – Dec. 19

Winterdance Celtic Christmas Show – Dec. 19

Thursday, December 19th, 2013 Trinity Cathedral 

This holiday season San José – Dublin Sister City Program, Inc. has a first time event for your enjoyment: Winterdance, The Show, presented for the first time at Trinity Cathedral, 81 North 2nd Street, Downtown San Jose on Thursday, December 19th, 7:30 PM!

More details:

San Jose Dublin Sister Cities FLYER

The Carillon Newsletter- September

The Carillon is our monthly newsletter. We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.
CLICK HERE

 

Our Church

Our Church

Trinity on Facebook

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Celebrating 150 Years

Celebrating 150 Years

The Carlillon Newsletters Archive

The Carillon is the monthly newsletter of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral. Submissions may be sent via email to the office or to editor, Sara Calkins, at [email protected]. Please indicate “For the Carillon” in the subject line.

We hope you’ll read The Carillon here online.  In addition to helping us control office costs and reduce waste, you get to read each each issue in full color!  However, if you would like a paper copy mailed to your home, you can subscribe by contacting the Cathedral office.

Posada

Posada

Saturday Lunch Program

Saturday Lunch Program

On the second Saturday of each month, Trinity members meet in the Great Hall to prepare a lunch and then serve it to people who are homeless at the Cecil B. White Center. Learn more

Diocese Service

Diocese Service

Companion Diocese Service – Sept. 20, 2009

Learn more about our Companion Dioceses program on the El Camino Real Diocese website.

Easter Egg Hunt

Easter Egg Hunt

Christmas Pageant

Christmas Pageant